1964 GEORGE WALLACE SIGNED LETTER RE CIVIL RIGHTS BILL

DSC06594This typed letter was SIGNED by the infamous segregationist Governor George C. Wallace on June 5, 1964, while Governor of the State of Alabama.  In this anti-Civil Rights document, we such quotes as “…As you know I am currently running in Presidential Primaries throughout the country and already have received an overwhelming protest vote against the Civil Rights bill…I believe that the majority of the people of this country do not wish to see this bill passed…

DSC06595 Continue reading

1965 ANTI-MARTIN LUTHER KING POSTCARD

DSC08620The heading of this postcard states “Martin Luther King at Communist Training school.” ON BACK: “Lower left, arms folded, is Abner W. Berry of the Central Communist Party.  To King’s right, Aubrey Williams, pres. of the communist front SCEF, and Myles Horton, dir. Highlander Folk School for communist training at Monteagle, Tenn.  Picture taken by secret counteragent during Red Workshop in race agitation.

DSC08621 Continue reading

1955-1960 Emmett Till Collection

Jet-Magazine-15sep55Many historians say that it was seeing the photos of Emmett Till’s mutilated body in THIS ISSUE (Sept 15, 1955) of Jet Magazine that sparked the Civil Rights Movement.  In fact, Rosa Parks’ refusing to give her seat to a white man occurred 95 days after Till’s death. The other 5 Jet Magazines in this collection show cover stories relating to Till’s death: “Will Mississippi Whitewash the Emmett Till Slaying?, Emmett Till’s Ghost Haunts Natchez, Where is Third Man in Till Lynching? How the Emmett Till Case Changed 5 Lives, Emmett Till’s Mother Starts a New Life.”  Continue reading

RARE HAZEL BRYAN MASSERY AUTOGRAPH

DSC06757 DSC06757b

I have never seen another Hazel Bryan Massery autograph.  Massery was the infamous white teenager captured on the front page of newspapers around the world (click here to see original front page newspaper offered in this collection) on September 04, 1957 when she verbally assaulted Elizabeth Eckford, an African-American, who was trying to enter Central High School (an all-white school) in Little Rock, Arkansas. Continue reading

1957 US ATTORNEY GEN’L SIGNED LETTER (ABOUT BOMBINGS) & ENVELOPE

DSC08838This is an extremely intriguing letter because of its reference to bombings.  The letter from US Attorney General Herbert Brownell, Jr. is addressed to James E. Folsom, Governor of Alabama and is in response to the Governor’s letter to the President of the United States.  The Governor was apparently asking for help from the Federal government, specifically, the FBI and Department of Justice.  The 50’s and 60’s were a period of racial upheaval, with Montgomery, Alabama being a major focal point of the Civil Rights Movement.

DSC08840

Continue reading

3 Poll Tax Receipts 1923, 1928, and 1958

DSC08877In U.S. practice, a poll tax was used as a de facto or implicit pre-condition of the exercise of the ability to vote. This tax emerged in some states of the United States in the late 19th century as part of the Jim Crow laws. After the ability to vote was extended to all races by the enactment of the Fifteenth Amendment, many Southern states enacted poll tax laws as a means of restricting black voters; such laws often included a grandfather clause, which allowed any adult male whose father or grandfather had voted in a specific year prior to the abolition of slavery to vote without paying the tax. These laws, along with unfairly implemented literacy tests and extra-legal intimidation, achieved the desired effect of disfranchising African-American and Native American voters, as well as poor whites.

DSC08891   DSC06336 Continue reading

1958 ARK. SEGREGATIONIST GOVERNOR ORVAL FAUBUS TLS (SIGNED)

DSC08850Governor Orval E. Faubus was the Governor who called out the National Guard to block nine African-American children from entering Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.  Typed Letter Signed as Governor, on colored State of Arkansas Letterhead, January 10, 1958.  Faubus makes reference to the challenge of integration in the letter by stating (after referencing “Pledge to the South”) “I am most grateful for your thoughtfulness and understanding of our situation.”  Boldly signed in black ink.

DSC08851

Continue reading

KKK Magazine “Night Riders” about Viola Liuzzo murder

DSC06602Possibly the most representative example of Klan propaganda, this may be the worst and most disgusting of the publications by the Klan/Citizens’ Councils.  Exploiting the murder of Viola Liuzzo, (a true hero of the Civil Rights Movement) by putting her body on the cover of their Klan “Night Riders” magazine as a trophy of their murderous efforts is about as low as it gets.

DSC06603 Continue reading

1958 RARE INTEGRATION PAMPHLET (CORE)

DSC06367 DSC06368

A rare gem, “A First Step Toward School Integration” is a pamphlet from the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE).  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. states at the beginning of the Foreward, “Can the method of non-violence that erased the color line in Montgomery’s buses be applied effectively to schools?  This pamphlet seeks an answer to that question, so urgent in southern communities where the Supreme Court decision of 1954 is not yet accepted.

farmer-james  Continue reading

8 SIGNATURES FROM THE LITTLE ROCK NINE

DSC08970One of the fine jewels of this black history collection is this original LIFE Magazine (in great condition) showing the cover story of the Central High Crisis with signatures from eight of the Little Rock Nine (Carlotta Ray Karlmark refused to sign and has moved to Sweden).

The Little Rock Nine were a group of African American students enrolled in previously all-white Little Rock Central High School in 1957. Their enrollment was followed by the Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Orval Faubus, the Governor of Arkansas. They then attended after the intervention of President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Continue reading

1962 CORE “THE RIGHT TO VOTE”

DSC06694 DSC06695 DSC06699

Violence and threats of violence against people of color threatened to keep them from voting.  This booklet was created in an effort to reduce fear and discouragement among African-Americans contemplating the vote.  Notice the photo caption that says “Most persons register without major difficulty.”  Nicely illustrated booklet, 22 pages, The Right To Vote by James McCain, Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), 1962.  A phenomenal artifact demonstrating one of the strategies incorporated to persuade African-Americans to vote.  Fine Condition.

Continue reading

1966 ANTI-MARTIN LUTHER KING CALIFORNIA NEWSLETTER

DSC06360This 1966 anti-Civil Rights newsletter is titled “RACIAL VIOLENCE AND HATRED” and is ironically from “Americans for Civil Harmony.”  In it, it attributes the fight for equality and civil rights to a communist plot.  It links Dr. King with illegal liquor sales and “promiscuous lewdness”; it identifies  several of his aides as “sex perverts” and “identified communists“.  It relies heavily on “perceptive critic”: J. Edgar Hoover.  This newsletter was part of the FBI propaganda campaign to discredit the Civil Rights Movement.  Like new condition.

DSC06361 DSC06363 Continue reading

2 NEW SOUTH Magazines, 1958 and 1963

DSC08553December 1958 and May 1963 issues of “New South Magazine”.  All articles are concerning segregation.  Each magazine is 16 pages.

The best and most valuable part is a chart showing a CHRONOLOGICAL LISTING OF SOUTHERN BOMBINGS from January 1, 1956 to June 1st 1963 (59 of them).  See the photo of the listing of bombings; amazing detail (many names of who was bombed or whether they were white integrationists, pastors, etc.).

DSC08556

Continue reading

BAYARD RUSTIN AUTOGRAPHED 8×10 PHOTO

DSC01071DSC01073

One of the most interesting confidants in Martin Luther King’s inner circle was Bayard Rustin.  When J. Edgar Hoover began a smear campaign to discredit Rustin based on his homosexuality (and therefore attempt to discredit the Civil Rights Movement), Dr. King distanced himself from him. To avoid attacks based on his sexual orientation, Rustin served rarely as a public spokesperson; he usually acted as an influential adviser to civil-rights leaders.  Bayard Rustin was a leading activist of the early 1947–1955 Civil-Rights Movement. He organized the first of the Freedom Rides (1947) to challenge racial segregation on interstate busing Continue reading

1952 REPUBLICAN CIVIL RIGHTS BROCHURE

DSC06588DSC06593

This 4 page political booklet is titled “More Civil Rights Double-Talk and More Goose Eggs”.  It was distributed by the Republican Congressional Committee in 1952 on behalf of Senator H. Alexander Smith.  The 4 page booklet is white (though discolored by age) with red and black print.  It includes political cartoons and photos of Eisenhower, Nixon, and Smith.  The content of the booklet details Republican proposals for Civil Rights issues” and highlights the Democratic party’s push for “White Supremacy”.  The booklet is not torn and other than slightly aged, is in mint condition. Continue reading

1962 NEGRO ENROLLMENT “ENDS SEGREGATION IN MISSISSIPPI” (James Meredith)

DSC08805DSC08806This is the famous and historic headline from the October 2, 1962 edition of The New York Times reporting THE END OF SEGREGATION IN MISSISSIPPI when James Meredith integrated the all-white University of Alabama.  White segregationists from around the state joined students and locals in a violent, 15-hour riot on the campus on September 30, in which two people were killed execution style, hundreds were wounded, and six federal marshals were shot. The headline reads “3,000 TROOPS PUT DOWN MISSISSIPPI RIOTS AND ARREST 112 AS NEGRO BEGINS CLASSES”.  A photo of The New York Times coverage of this event is included in Taylor Branch’s Pulitzer Prize winning masterpiece Parting the WatersOther articles include “Soldiers Beaten; Homes Damaged”, “Campus a Bivouac As Negro Enters”, and “Mobs Armed With Bottles and Bricks Terrorized Oxford From Dawn Until Noon” Continue reading

1926 RARE VERNON JOHNS PUBLISHED SERMON

DSC08669   m-2720vernon20johns   vernonjohns

Vernon Johns (April 22, 1892 – June 11, 1965) is considered by some as the father of the American Civil Rights Movement, having laid the foundation on which Martin Luther King, Jr. and others would build. Johns was a courageous and vocal opponent of segregation.  In 1926, he was the first African-American to have his work published in Best Sermons of the Year; this was a personal triumph for Johns as he had repeatedly submitted sermons for consideration in previous years Continue reading

1958 MONTGOMERY STORY COMIC (Fellowship of Reconciliation)

DSC08914This booklet titled “MARTIN LUTHER KING AND THE MONTGOMERY STORY” was published by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and sold for ten cents.  The subtitle says, “How 50,000 Negroes found a new way to end racial discrimination.”

1686077-mlk_comic_rosa_parks   1686072-mlk_comic_martin11686073-mlk_comic_montgomery_method

Martin Luther King’s relationship with the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) began during the Montgomery bus boycott, when FOR veteran Bayard Rustin Continue reading

DAISY BATES SIGNED 1ST ED. AUTOBIOGRAPHY

DSC08995DSC08996

This is a rare 1st Edition SIGNED copy of Daisy Bates’ autobiography The Long Shadow of Little Rock.  Just 5 years after the Little Rock Crisis, she writes “Especially for a freedom fighter.  May God keep you.  Daisy Bates Nov. 6, 1926 (she obviously meant 1962).  Ms. Bates passed away in 1999.  After the nine black students were selected to attend all-white Central High, Mrs. Daisy Bates would be with Continue reading

1956 EISENHOWER INTEGRATION AD TARGETING BLACK COMMUNITY

DSC08864 DSC08865This 1956 Advertisement is a double-sided card intended for distribution within the black community.  On one side it lists all of Eisenhower’s desegregation accomplishments that have benefitted African-Americans; the other side claims that Stevenson is a “fence-sitter”.

It shows that under Eisenhower…

No more segregation in Washington D.C.–Hotels, Restaurants, and Schools, over 300 jobs for Negroes paying $6,000-$17,500 per year, no more segregation in Veterans Hospitals, no more separate water fountains or rest rooms in Navy shipyards, no more segregation in the Armed Forces.”


111 JET MAGAZINES FROM 1950’s & 1960’s

DSC00660This huge lot of 111 Jet Magazines is a fascinating time capsule taking you into all of the issues of the Black community before and during the Civil Rights Movement.  Note some of the cover stories: “BOYCOTT EXCLUSIVE: What’s Happening In Montgomery?, Will Bombs Keep Integration Out of Alabama?, Tenn. Negroes Who Must Vote In Tents Because They Voted, Will the Bates Be Forced To Quit Little Rock?, Parents: Unsung Heroes In School Integration Crisis, The Woman Who Tried To Kill King, The Girl Who Upset Alabama (Arthurine Lucy), Ambush Shooting of Meredith, Muhammad Ali’s Draft Dispute Continue reading

1989 SIGNED RALPH ABERNATHY AUTOBIOGRAPHY

DSC08655 DSC08654This is an almost perfect 1st edition boldly SIGNED copy of Ralph Abernathy’s autobiography.  Ralph David Abernathy, Sr. (March 11, 1926 – April 17, 1990) was a leader of the American Civil Rights Movement, a minister, and the best friend of Martin Luther King, Jr. in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. bayard_wide-5dbb299753fe1cf46f5162575eff3362b1cd3575Abernathy was also the organizer of the first mass meeting of the Montgomery Bus Boycott to protest Rosa Parks’ arrest on December 1, 1955. Abernathy and his friend Martin Luther King, Jr. organized the boycott and gave birth to the American Civil Rights Movement.  Following King’s assassination, Dr. Abernathy took up the leadership of the SCLC Poor People’s Campaign and led the March on Washington, D.C., that had been planned for May 1968.


 

SIGNED TUSKEGEE AIRMAN POSTER

DSC08694 DSC08696 DSC08697 DSC08698

Four original Tuskegee Airmen have autographed this oversized poster (see wristwatch for size) for the movie “The Tuskegee Airmen.”  Among the bold signatures on this poster is that of Robert Williams.  Williams wrote the story for the movie, but more importantly, he was a distinguished and decorated pilot with the famed Tuskegee Airmen.  Most of these flying heroes have now passed away.  I aquired this poster and had it signed at the world premiere of the movie where several original Tuskegee Airmen were in attendance and agreed to sign. Continue reading

1965 ORIGINAL INFAMOUS PHOTO OF BEATEN MARCHER

DSC08847

DSC08845 bloody amelia_boyntont_selma_alabama

This is the infamous photo of Amelia Boynton Robinson being gassed and beaten while marching for the right to vote.  She was eventually left for dead after being beaten with a billy club for her participation in a peaceful march (across the Edmund Pettus Bridge) for the right to vote. Evidence that this photo went around the world is the fact this is an original press photo from a Latin American country (everything is in Spanish).

Click here to see the autographed copy of Ms. Boynton Robinson’s autobiography. Continue reading

1957 DAISY BATES SIGNED COVER LIFE MAGAZINE

DSC08971

 

DSC089723835244082_3904cac6f1

I am fairly confident you will never see this again–the late Daisy Bates has signed an almost-perfect copy of the Little Rock Nine edition of Life Magazine.

After the nine black students were selected to attend Central High Mrs. Daisy Bates would be with them every step of the way. Bates guided and advised the nine students, known as the Little Rock Nine, when they attempted to enroll in 1957 at Little Rock Central High School, a previously all-white institution. The students’ attempts to enroll provoked a confrontation with Governor Orval Faubus, who called out the National Guard to prevent their entry. White mobs met at the school and threatened to kill the black students; these mobs harassed not only activists but also northern journalists who came to cover the story. Continue reading

2 JAMES MEREDITH SIGNATURES

DSC06315 DSC06316 DSC06317

This is a collection of two signatures from Civil Rights legend James Meredith.  One signature is on the cover of a program where he spoke in the 90’s; the other signature is on the cover of a booklet he sold based on his autobiography.   In 1962, James Meredith was the first African-American student admitted to the segregated University of Mississippi, an event that was a flashpoint in the African American civil rights movement.  Inspired by President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address, Meredith decided to exercise his constitutional rights and apply to the University of Mississippi. His goal was to put pressure on the Kennedy administration to enforce civil rights for African Americans. Continue reading

1965 JOHN LEWIS SIGNED LIFE MAG

DSC08975DSC08976John Lewis (pictured at the front of the line on this cover) has boldly signed this March 19, 1965 LIFE Magazine that features the Selma, Alabama cover story of “Bloody Sunday”…when peaceful demonstrators were beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge by State Troopers.

The 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches, also known as “Bloody Sunday” and the two marches that followed, led to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a landmark achievement of the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. Continue reading

JAMES FARMER AUTOGRAPHED PHOTO

DSC088433×5 autographed photo of Civil Rights activist James L. Farmer.

James Leonard Farmer, Jr. (January 12, 1920 – July 9, 1999) was a civil rights activist and leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. He was the initiator and organizer of the 1961 Freedom Ride, which eventually led to the desegregation of inter-state transportation in the United States. Continue reading

1963 “NEGROES PROTEST IN GREENSBORO; 400 ARRESTED”

DSC08738 DSC08739

This May 18, 1963 edition of The Montgomery Advertiser shows a headline of “Gov. Wallace Files Suit Against Kennedy In D.C.” with subtitle “President Urges Racial Harmony“.  Other articles included “Negroes Protest in Greensboro; 400 Arrested” and “Birmingham Increases Patrols For Weekend“.  The latter article, referring to threats of racial bombing says “Negro volunteers posted themselves at the homes of integration leaders and churches Friday night.” Continue reading

4 “CRISIS” MAGS (NAACP) from 1955,1966 (2), & 1968

DSC00657These 4 Crisis Magazines are published by the NAACP and are from 1955, 1966 (2), and 1968.  These magazines are filled with articles and photos on the Civil Rights Movement and outstanding achievements of African-Americans.  Note the article (see photo) entitled “Again the Name Negro” and the photo of the burned-down house of NAACP leader Vernon Dahmer (see photo).

DSC06441

Continue reading

1980 ROY WILKINS SIGNED FDC

DSC00633DSC00634

This is a signature from NAACP’s Roy Wilkins (signed one year before he died) on an “Official First Day of Issue” Cover honoring Harriet Tubman. It is postmarked February 1, 1978 and also includes a 13 cent Harriet Tubman stamp.  Wilkins has signed with a blue pen.  In 1955, Roy Wilkins was chosen to be the executive secretary of the NAACP and in 1964 he became its executive director. He had an excellent reputation as an articulate spokesperson for the civil rights movement. One of his first actions was to provide support to civil rights activists in Mississippi who were being subject to a “credit squeeze” by members of the White Citizens Councils. Continue reading

3 CIVIL RIGHTS MAGAZINES

DSC00677DSC00711  DSC08974 DSC00676

This is the August 21, 1967 edition of Newsweek (with the cover story “The Black Mood“) and the March 5, 1965 edition of LIFE Magazine (with the cover story “A Monument to Negro Upheaval” about the death of Malcolm X and the “Resulting Vengeful Gang War”).  Also included is the August 22, 1966 edition of Newsweek with cover story “Black and White: A Major Survey of U.S. Racial Attitudes Today“; this issue addresses the racial turbulence that defined 1966.


1965 KLAN TRIAL (LIFE MAGAZINE)

DSC06713This is the complete Life Magazine from May 21, 1965 with the cover story “Courtroom pictures of the Klan Murder Trial: Defense Lawyer Matt Murphy’s victory sign”. Matt Murphy was the Klan attorney.

The following, about the trial (but not in the magazine), is VERY interesting…

Twice frustrated in attempts to convict Collie Leroy Wilkins for the murder of Viola Liuzzo, federal prosecutors successfully prosecuted Wilkins with an 1870 law for depriving Liuzzo of her civil rights.

On March 25, 1965, thousands of civil rights marchers converged on the Alabama state capitol in Montgomery, demanding an end to obstacles to black voter registration. The day of speeches ended Continue reading

BOMBING in Birmingham–1963 Newsweek, Near MINT

DSC08563Cleanest copy you will ever see of the September 30, 1963 Newsweek with the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama on the cover.  Inside is an excellent article with great photographs entitled “Birmingham: My God, you’re not even safe in church!”  A great time capsule.

Beside the magazine’s fantastic condition, it DOES NOT HAVE A MAILING LABEL.  It is as if it is fresh off the newsstand.

DSC08564 Continue reading

1963 LIFE MAG (MEDGAR EVERS FUNERAL)

DSC08579

Heartbreaking Life Magazine from the funeral of Medgar Evers, June 28, 1963.  Magazine is in fantastic condition.
Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963) was an African-American civil rights activist from Mississippi involved in efforts to overturn segregation at the University of Mississippi. After returning from overseas military service in World War II and completing his secondary education, he became active in the civil rights movement. He became a field secretary for the NAACP.  Evers was assassinated by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council. As a veteran, Evers was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery. His murder and the resulting trials inspired civil rights protests, as well as numerous works of art, music, and film.Medgar_Evers Continue reading

Mississippi Summer-1964 Newsweek, Near MINT Condition

DSC08544Cleanest copy you will ever see of the July 13, 1964 Newsweek with “Mississippi Summer 1964” on the cover.  Inside is an excellent article with great photos.  Inside, “Troubled State, Troubled Time.”  A great time capsule.  You’ll find coverage of the voting drive, the murder of Schwermer, Chaney, and Goodman, the police, civil rights, and more.

Besides the magazine’s fantastic condition, it DOES NOT HAVE a mailing label.   It’s as if it is fresh off the newsstand after exactly 50 years. Continue reading